News

  • 3 Ergonomic Tips That Will Help You Have Better Posture at Work

    Posted on by Jo Wozniak

    The ability to maintain good posture has a lot to do with your work environment. While establishing a stretching routine and an hourly posture correction Microstep can do wonders for your back and general well-being, at the end of the day, it’s much harder to sustain a neutral spine or other elements of good posture if your office setup won’t support them. Below are three tips that will make your workspace work for you, and put you on a fast track to improved posture.

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  • Looking To Enhance Employee Productivity In 2020? Studies Show Your Company Should Offer These 4 Things

    Posted on by Jo Wozniak

    With employee turnover higher than ever despite innovative company policies (from unlimited vacation to paternity leave to generous stock option plans) becoming commonplace, it can be challenging to keep talented team members productive, engaged and happy. In fact, according to a recent Gallup poll, only 34% of American workers feel engaged at their workplace, and most unengaged workers eventually either leave, are let go, or are a threat to a healthy company culture.

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  • The Role of Ergonomics in Corporate Fitness

    Posted on by Jo Wozniak

    Every year in the United States, there are approximately 735,000 heart attacks [1]. I the United Kingdom, there are more than 100,000 hear attacks per annum [2]. Many countries around the globe are experiencing a rise in obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. These medical conditions can lead to myocardial infarctions, or heart attacks.

     

    Ergonomic Workplace

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  • Sitting is bad for your brain -- not just your metabolism or heart

    Posted on by Jo Wozniak

    If you want to take a good stroll down memory lane, new research suggests you'd better get out of that chair more often.

    In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have found that in people middle-aged and older, a brain structure that is key to learning and memory is plumpest in those who spend the most time standing up and moving. At every age, prolonged sitters show less thickness in the medial temporal lobe and the subregions that make it up, the study found.

    The prospect of thinning in the brain's medial temporal lobe should spark plenty of worry.

    Sitting Can Damage Brain Function

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  • Sitting, Back Pain And Its Causes

    Posted on by Jo Wozniak

    How Sitting Causes Back Pain

    According to a study published in 2013 by the Mayo Clinic, back pain is the third most common cause of doctor visits in the United States. And according to American Family Physician, only 25 to 30% of people seek treatment for their back pain. So if you're experiencing back pain, you're not alone. Many back pain sufferers struggle with what's causing their back pain, not realizing the 8 or more hours they spend sitting could be the main culprit.

    The most common cause of lower back pain is postural stress. For this reason, lower back pain is frequently brought on by sitting too long, prolonged bending, heavy lifting, or even standing or laying down, all for a long time in a poor, rounded back position. According to Cornell University Department of Ergonomics, up to 90% more pressure is put on your back when you sit vs. when you stand. There are several reasons why, the first being that if you’re like most Americans, you habitually sit in ways that cause tension and imbalance in your back and neck. This applies to sitting at work, in the car, and at home.

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